Caprica

So SyFy said adieu to the prequel series to the wildly and critically successful Battlestar Galactica with a burning off of the final five episodes left of the one and, sadly, only season of the series. I’m in the minority of Sci-fi fans when I say I wasn’t a fan of BSG. I tried watching it here and there, even tuned in to watch the original airing of the mini-series  all those years ago, but the show never managed to grab a hold of me. Not to say the show wasn’t good, the basic premise and ideas behind the overall story sounded good and based on what I’ve read and from friend’s comments, BSG was one of the best shows to air in a long time.

I’m also betting I’m in the minority when I say that I loved Caprica. The thing with Caprica was the depth of the show and it’s ideas about religion, race, technology and the abuses of it. What also made it stand out were the questions it asked and made you face while drawing parallels with our own world and society. Questions about religion and faith, and what happens when we die. Just what is the soul? Is it some unseen force that resides within us until we die? Or is it our life’s accumulation of experiences and memories, feelings and thoughts that can be downloaded and re-uploaded into another existence and eventually…body. And when one posses the technology to, in essence recreate life, should that person have the right to play God, regardless of the outcome (which we know from BSG is a bad one for mankind)?

What happens to a society when it’s allowed to act out, to give in, to it’s animalistic nature in a virtual world only to go back to a more civilized person once they leave it? And do any of those actions carry over into the real world? Although Caprica is set in a different time,  and place from our own, the comparisons are obvious to our world and society.

The problem with Caprica, and I’ll be the first to admit this, is its pacing. It simply took too long to get to certain points. While that can be fine for a show that’s already established itself, it’s tantamount to series suicide with a new show, even if it already has a built in fan base. Pacing and some plot developments aside, I thought that Caprica was one of the best written, and well executed shows (aside from the occasional wonky cg) made recently, and I’ll miss what could’ve been, though the shows creators didn’t leave the fans hanging, basically showing the audience all the things to come (or would’ve came if the series had survived) in a final and beautiful montage. Caprica, much like its predecessor, serves as a warning to the excesses of man and his use and reliance of technology and what happens when you abuse it. The parallels it draws with our own world is both fascinating and frightening, and that’s part of what made the show so great.

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5 thoughts on “Caprica

      1. lindy says:

        Oh. Well isn’t it a type of spice? Oh wait, that’s Paprika. And yay for making your background. Make me one that’s red. 😀

  1. Ted says:

    Caprica was the best show on television. Failure to market the show properly, find just the right timeslot for it, or create enough initial episodes to allow it to take hold (season 1.5?) does not make it a bad show.

    Yes, it’s been said that the show had a slow pace but it was working for me. I’ll trade a little pace for richly developed storyline and characters. I certainly don’t see how it could be called ‘slow’ by any means.

    I was a huge BSG fan and had my doubts about Caprica but it surpassed my expectations. It was totally worthy of the BSG name. I loved it and will miss it.

    For the record, I bought Season 1 & 1.5 just to cast the economic vote even though I had seen them all already through other means.

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